Tuesday, January 16, 2007

Charleston Universalists and the art of the duel

Ok, I went to the State Archives, and looked at a couple of the documents...
on microfilm! Did I ever mention how much I hate microfilm?

anyway the Universalists were petitioning the SC General Assembly to let them change their name, sell some of their land, etc. They were doing that as late as 1859 - certainly looking like they made it up to the war....

Still doing research into the few names I found...

and then there is this from a 1970 reprinting of the famous works of Theophilus Fisk (minister and banking reformer) where former SC Governor J. L. Wilson (1784-1849) writes Fisk a letter on behalf of the trustees of the board of the First Universalist Church in Charleston, asking him to please renew his contract for another year. I don't know when Gov Wilson became an Universalist, but this was after the time he was Charleston's representative to the 1832 Nullification Convention, and before the 1838 publication of his most famous book CODE OF HONOR, which basically is a gentleman's dueling book. This was THE how-to book on correct dueling etiquette...


the book:

2 comments:

boyinthebands said...

Dueling! Oh dear, I knew some thought Fisk a loon, but I never saw that coming.

SC Universalist said...

Well, having Govenor Wilson in his congrgation would have helped put Fisk in the upper crust of society.
While Pertigu and the other firebrands of Charleston and Carolina would have been against Fisk the Banking Reformer (and of course they were), they would have surported Fisk the friend of Wilson.
The last duel in SC was in the 1880s: Cash - Shannon Duel; and dueling was outlawed for the upper classes then... and socialy unacceptable (which would have been the real reason for the death kill of the duel). Cash later tried a housing develpement (ie: planned town) on his farmland, attracted a handful of folks short term - including V.P. Clayton, MD and his father Rev. D. B. Clayton